Drawing: Overall Dimensions

Top Dimensions

Formula 1000 race car top view overall dimensions

I’ve been getting requests for the dimensions of the car from around the world. This should help. Some of the aerodynamic details have changed since this 3D model was made, so don’t take this drawing too literally. If you click on the image above you’ll get a PDF file with both top and side views dimensioned and in high resolution.

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Laying Up a Carbon-Fiber Honeycomb Front Impact Attenuator

Impact attenuator

Nose in place while epoxying aluminum hard points into correct positions

SCCA FB rules require a metallic or composite front impact attenuator. Can’t have cars running around on the track with a battering ram on the front… My impact attenuation structure, or crash box, consists of a carbon-fiber and honeycomb sandwich laid up directly on the inside of the fiberglass nose. The carbon fiber varies from four layers at the front to eight layers around the rear attachment points so that it will crush progressively from the front to the back. Cylindrical aluminum inserts are used in the honeycomb as hard mounting points for the wing to the nose and for the nose to the chassis. This area is designed to be strong enough not just to absorb impacts but to allow lifting the front of the car by the front wing.

Welding on More Random Jingly Bits

Shiny Frame

Some shiny frame porn for you…

I had not realized how many small brackets and things need to be fabricated and welded onto the frame before it can be painted. Weeks of work…

The nose mounts are so strong because the car will be lifted by a nose jack under the wing in the pits.

 

Mounting the Rear Sprocket

Mounted

Rear sprocket mounted on the differential

The limited-slip differential is a torsen or quaife type made by OBX, imported from the USA for an American-style Honda Civic. The differential ring gear on American Honda Civics is mounted with left-hand threaded bolts, so I blithely go down to the auto recycler here in Thailand and buy a differential for donor parts. Hmmmm… these bolts don’t fit. So I check carefully and find these differentials are sold in Thailand with right-hand threads! I go back to the auto recycler and ask for left-hand threaded bolts. They just look at me with that “crazy foreigner” look. OK, all we have to do is order some American-style bolts from Ebay US… There is exactly one listing on all of Ebay, and they don’t ship to Thailand! Plan B: drill the suckers out and use through-bolts.

This is where I find out the differential housing is made of some ultra-hard tool steel, or maybe kryptonite or something. Wow, are these holes difficult to drill out. Solid carbide end mill, highest speed on the milling machine, lots of lubrication, and wait. And wait. And wait…

Next we had to drill a matching hole pattern in the rear sprocket, then cut it in two halves for quick changing at the track. This sprocket will be for static test only as the new hole pattern wasn’t compatible with the old one, leaving thin aluminum in some places. I’ve since ordered a blank rear sprocket from England which I will cut with only the correct holes.

Building the Frame: Roll Hoop to Tail

Building the Cockpit

Time for a photo update showing how I built the cockpit, tube by tube.